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Visual Revolutionary

BECAUSE WE ARE INTERESTED IN PEOPLE'S STORY, AND NOT WHAT TYPE OF GEAR THEY USE, WE INTRODUCE A NEW MUCH NEEDED PODCAST IN THE WORLD OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND FILMMAKING. FEATURING IN-DEPTH CONVERSATIONS WITH SOME OF THE WORLD'S LEADING PHOTOGRAPHERS, FILMMAKERS, AND OTHER VISUAL ARTISTS, WE ARE BRINGING YOU THE BACKSTORY ON HOW THEY GOT TO WHERE THEY ARE TODAY.
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Now displaying: February, 2017
Feb 21, 2017

On this episode of the podcast we sit down with renowned portrait photographer, illustrator, writer, and category defying creative, Dan Winters.  Although you might know Dan from his critically acclaimed portraits of iconic celebrities, musicians, and cultural influencers, he has built a reputation for his ability to capture a broad range of subjects, and has produced a dizzying amount of work across an array of genres.  Whether shooting the last shuttle launches for NASA or a portrait of the President, Dan has an ability to interpret the subject at hand with a very unique eye that has been influenced by years of curiosity.  Growing up in a small agricultural town in Southern California, Dan's life could have easily gone in a number of directions.  He was fascinated by entomology as a young kid and learned to raise bees as a member of the local 4-H club.  It was also there that he would first study photography and the darkroom process.  Although photography would stay a part of his life, he seemed to be on a fast track to working in the motion picture industry when he secured a full time job working in miniature construction and design while still in high school for John Dykstra's newly created Apogee Inc.  After a while though, Dan's love of photography won over his attention and he went to college to pursue photojournalism.  Dan started his career shooting for the local news chronicle in Ventura County, but before long he had the opportunity to move to New York and the rest is history.  Dan would go on to be a regular contributor for magazines like Esquire, GQ, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, Wired, and many more, and rack up over 100 national and international awards.  During our conversation with Dan we get the chance to ask him how to properly show diversity in your portfolio, which images he remembers being milestones to his successful career, why he left LA for Austin, TX, and how he manages to juggle so many creative projects.  So sit back and enjoy our conversation with a true legend in the industry.

To Learn More About Dan Winters Visit:

http://www.danwintersphoto.com

 

About Visual Revolutionary:

http://www.visualrevolutionary.com

Because we are interested in people's story, and not what type of gear they use, we introduce a new much needed podcast in the world of photography and filmmaking.  Featuring in-depth conversations with some of the world's leading photographers, filmmakers, and other visual artists, we are bringing you the backstory on how they got to where they are today.  

Feb 10, 2017

On this episode of the podcast we get the chance to talk to photographer, alchemist, wet plate collodion pioneer, and all around inspirational figure Ian Ruhter.  Although many know Ian from the short film "Silver and Light" that instantly burst him onto the public stage, he was a very accomplished shooter years before that.  Ian had created a solid reputation as a talented snowboard photographer with a career trajectory that seemed to be moving quicker than he could have ever anticipated.  He was pushing the limits, and became one of the shooters helping to elevate snowboard photography to a world of complicated lighting schematics and big sets.  The work was fun, the money kept coming, and it seemed inevitable that he would most likely head towards the world of fashion and lifestyle photography.  In the midst of what most would consider "success" however, Ian had an unsettling feeling of dissatisfaction.  He began to lose interest in what he was shooting and started to question the rampant consumerism that he was helping promote.  He then did what most could never imagine doing.  He walked away from all of it and set out on a mission that some told him was impossible.  He built the largest wet plate collodion camera the world had ever seen, that was housed inside a truck, and began touring the country with a reinvigorated passion for photography.  During our conversation we get the chance to ask him what it was like walking away from a career many would kill to have, how he continued to believe in his vision in the midst of so much doubt, what it's like to shoot portraits that sometimes take hours for each plate, how inspiring it was to work closely with actor Gary Oldman teaching him the process of wet plate photography, and what the next chapter holds for Ian and the crew.  So join us for a great story with an amazing "underdog" message of following your dreams.  

To Learn More About Ian Ruhter Visit:

http://www.ianruhter.com

Check out their Latest Film "The Carnival of Dreams" 

https://vimeo.com/198070852

 

About Visual Revolutionary:

http://www.visualrevolutionary.com

Because we are interested in people's story, and not what type of gear they use, we introduce a new much needed podcast in the world of photography and filmmaking.  Featuring in-depth conversations with some of the world's leading photographers, filmmakers, and other visual artists, we are bringing you the backstory on how they got to where they are today.  

Feb 3, 2017

On this episode of the podcast we are joined by renowned street photographer and Magnum member Bruce Gilden. Have you ever found yourself walking down a busy street, looking into the faces of those who walk by, wondering to yourself what they are thinking, or projecting your own emotions or stories into their life? That’s what Bruce has made a living doing. Although some critics have accused his work of being exploitive, after almost two hours of talking and laughing with him, I can say with a fair amount of confidence that the only thing he is exploiting is himself. Whether he sees the family figures he grew up with, the old characters of the streets he used to play in, or the pain and suffering of his own journey and struggles, he connects with faces at a very emotional and gut level. He sees a glimpse of himself and tries to capture it. Growing up in Brooklyn, Bruce used to look out the windows and watch the characters of the city go by. His father was a tough character in his own right and someone Bruce feels like he has photographed over and over again. When Bruce found sports, he started to find his own voice. He excelled in basketball and baseball, but he always wanted to box. Although his father would never allow him to get into boxing, Bruce ended up developing an aggressive one two punch with his style of street photography that he would become famous for. Today we talk about his legendary career and how it all started. We get the chance to hear about some of his favorite places he’s been, what he feels like is a common thread in the people he shoots all over the world, and what’s kept him going for all these years. So sit back and enjoy this conversation about characters from a true character.

To Learn More About Bruce Gilden Visit:

http://www.brucegilden.com

 

About Visual Revolutionary:

http://www.visualrevolutionary.com

Because we are interested in people's story, and not what type of gear they use, we introduce a new much needed podcast in the world of photography and filmmaking.  Featuring in-depth conversations with some of the world's leading photographers, filmmakers, and other visual artists, we are bringing you the backstory on how they got to where they are today.  

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