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Visual Revolutionary

BECAUSE WE ARE INTERESTED IN PEOPLE'S STORY, AND NOT WHAT TYPE OF GEAR THEY USE, WE INTRODUCE A NEW MUCH NEEDED PODCAST IN THE WORLD OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND FILMMAKING. FEATURING IN-DEPTH CONVERSATIONS WITH SOME OF THE WORLD'S LEADING PHOTOGRAPHERS, FILMMAKERS, AND OTHER VISUAL ARTISTS, WE ARE BRINGING YOU THE BACKSTORY ON HOW THEY GOT TO WHERE THEY ARE TODAY.
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Now displaying: December, 2016
Dec 28, 2016

On this week's episode of the podcast, we sit down with photographer, author, teacher, and all around nice guy Michael Clark.  He's become one of the most respected adventure sports photographers around, working with huge clients like Red Bull, Nikon, and Adobe, as well as almost every sports brand and publication you can think of.  But photography wasn't always his first choice.  Although he showed early promise as a talented artist, Michael chose to study physics in college and pursued a career in science right out of school.  Rock climbing had also come into his life around this time however, and before long he realized that his true calling was to travel and climb. He quit his job in the university physics department and took off on a road trip that would last years.  During that time, the camera became a familiar appendage to capture the adventures that were now ruling his life.  Climbing photography would be what propelled Michael into the world of professional photography, but his science background would have him constantly looking to deepen his knowledge of photography, and soon he found himself immersed in the world of adventure sports in general.  Michael would go on to travel the globe, working with a huge list of editorial and corporate clients.  He also began to teach others how he achieved the looks he was known for in several published books.  During our conversation, we get the chance to ask Michael how adventure sports photography might lead to flow states of consciousness, how the pressure of "getting the shot" gets amplified when athletes are putting their lives on the line, and how he continues to evolve as a photographer after all these years of shooting.  So enjoy our conversation with Michael Clark.  

To Learn More About Michael Clark Visit:

http://www.michaelclarkphoto.com

 

About Visual Revolutionary:

http://www.visualrevolutionary.com

Because we are interested in people's story, and not what type of gear they use, we introduce a new much needed podcast in the world of photography and filmmaking.  Featuring in-depth conversations with some of the world's leading photographers, filmmakers, and other visual artists, we are bringing you the backstory on how they got to where they are today.  

 

Dec 21, 2016

On this episode of the podcast, we sit down with renowned photographer Glen E. Friedman.  To take a look through some of Friedman's archive is like stepping back into time and getting the chance to live through the subcultures he was there to bare witness to.  He created images that would help define a generation.  From the Dogtown Days of skateboarding with Tony Alva and Jay Adams, to the raw energy of punk with Black Flag and Minor Threat, to the early days of hip hop with the Beastie Boys and Run DMC, Friedman was there with a camera in hand.  The list of recognizable names and artists that he helped visually introduce to the world goes on and on and stands as a testament to his own taste in what he thought was important to photograph.  From a very early age, Glen E. Friedman was attracted to photography and began to realize that some of the people that were shooting the culture he was a part of didn't seem to know how to approach it.  By the age of 15 he was getting published in Skateboarder magazine, and a few years later he was shooting the punk bands that had begun to become the soundtrack of his own rebellious attitude.  After venturing into a new endeavor of managing and producing an album for Suicidal Tendencies, Friedman started to get turned on to some of the new sounds of hip hop coming out of New York.  It wasn't long before he became friends with Rick Ruben and Russell Simmons and started shooting some of the iconic album covers that those of us that lived through the 80s and early 90s will definitely remember.  Through it all, Friedman always stayed passionate about photography, and tried to only shoot the things that he was moved by.  During our conversation we get the chance to ask Friedman what he thinks the next youth movement will be, what it's like to work with some of the biggest names in music, and the advice he gives to others about following their passion.  So enjoy our conversation with Glen E. Friedman.  

To Learn More About Glen E. Friedman Visit:

http://burningflags.com/home/

 

About Visual Revolutionary:

http://www.visualrevolutionary.com

Because we are interested in people's story, and not what type of gear they use, we introduce a new much needed podcast in the world of photography and filmmaking.  Featuring in-depth conversations with some of the world's leading photographers, filmmakers, and other visual artists, we are bringing you the backstory on how they got to where they are today.  

Dec 14, 2016

On this episode of the podcast we sit down with Commercial Photographer, Canon Explorer of Light, and Teacher Joel Grimes.  As a kid, Joel was always creative, but it wasn't until his freshman year in high school that Joel finally picked up a camera and knew that he had found the art form he was looking for.  Although Joel had some early success in the world of photography and was building a national client base, it wasn't until he decided to completely reinvent himself, and his overall look, that he suddenly burst on to the scene as a recognizable name.  Using a three light setup, composites, and somewhat of a grunge look, Joel became a very sought after commercial shooter.  Soon he began teaching others how he created the look and realized that he really enjoyed teaching. After several public speaking events, he created a video tutorial system and started teaching his own personal workshops across the country.  Joel has gone onto to shoot some of world's top athletes, worked on huge ad campaigns, and continued to help others to realize their own dreams in photography.  During this conversation we get the chance to ask Joel what has kept him excited about photography for all of these years, how he deals with sometimes being "pigeonholed" for a certain aesthetic, the amount of personal projects he tries to challenge himself with every year, and the advice he gives to others on building a portfolio.  So enjoy this talk with Joel Grimes.

To Learn More About Joel Grimes Visit:

http://www.joelgrimes.com

To Learn More About Joel's Workshops Visit:

http://www.joelgrimesworkshops.com

 

About Visual Revolutionary:

http://www.visualrevolutionary.com

Because we are interested in people's story, and not what type of gear they use, we introduce a new much needed podcast in the world of photography and filmmaking.  Featuring in-depth conversations with some of the world's leading photographers, filmmakers, and other visual artists, we are bringing you the backstory on how they got to where they are today.  

Dec 7, 2016

On this episode of the podcast we get the opportunity to speak with National Geographic photographer, filmmaker, and writer Pete McBride.  Pete tells us about growing up on a ranch outside of Aspen, Colorado and the first time he remembers picking up a camera.  From his early days as a kid helping his dad herd cattle, to all the days he spent skiing in the mountains, he felt a calling to study land management and the environment around him.  It was this interest, and trying to write for publications on those topics, that finally led him to photography.  Pete quickly gravitated towards travel, adventure, and expedition work.  He wanted to take photos of the far away places and people he had always dreamed about, but he soon began to become disenfranchised with what he would call "adventure porn" and realized there was a story in his own back yard.  Although he had grown up around the Colorado River, Pete realized how little he really understood about it's history and it's destination.  He soon set out to produce a story about the river which would lead him on a path to becoming what National Geographic would call a "freshwater hero".  Since then, Pete has continued to document rivers, people, places, and the story of the planet, and has inspired many others to look at the world around them a little closer.  During this conversation we got the chance to ask Pete what keeps him from getting burned out, how to present a story and not just photography, why he stayed in Colorado after all the years of travel, and what advice he gives to those dreaming of one day working for National Geographic.  So enjoy our conversation with someone out there helping to tell the stories that need to be told.  

To Learn More About Pete McBride Visit:

http://www.petemcbride.com

 

About Visual Revolutionary:

http://www.visualrevolutionary.com

Because we are interested in people's story, and not what type of gear they use, we introduce a new much needed podcast in the world of photography and filmmaking.  Featuring in-depth conversations with some of the world's leading photographers, filmmakers, and other visual artists, we are bringing you the backstory on how they got to where they are today.  

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